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Holocord syrinx associated with haemangioblastoma
  1. Jeremy Cosgrove1,
  2. Daniel Warren2,
  3. Chris Derham3,
  4. Stuart Jamieson1
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK
  3. 3Department of Neurosurgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jeremy Cosgrove, Department of Neurology, F Floor, Martin Wing, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX, UK; jezcos{at}doctors.net.uk

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Case report

A 50-year-old man gave a 6-year history of muscle wasting and weakness of both legs. He had noticed marked muscle loss across his chest and back and ‘spasms’ of his legs at night, often induced by coughing or sneezing. There were no sensory symptoms or problems with sphincters, speech or swallowing.

On examination, there was muscle wasting in both legs and in the pectoral muscles, but no fasciculations. There was increased tone in all four limbs, with several beats of clonus in the legs. His strength was normal when examined on the couch, although he was adamant that he was not as strong as he used to be. Reflexes were brisk bilaterally in all four limbs and both plantars were upgoing. Sensations to fine touch and to joint-position sense were normal; vibration sense …

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