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Abdominal pseudocyst: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting
  1. Rameesha Anwar1,2,
  2. Ahmed-Ramadan Sadek1,2,
  3. Girish Vajramani1,2
  1. 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Wessex Neurological Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
  2. 2 Division of Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
  1. Correspondence to Mr Ahmed-Ramadan Sadek, Department of Neurosurgery, Wessex Neurological Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; ahmed-ramadan.sadek{at}uhs.nhs.uk

Abstract

Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting. It is well known in children but uncommon in adults. We present a 30-year-old woman with abdominal distension, vomiting and confusion caused by her developing an abdominal CSF pseudocyst, 13 years after her last shunt revision. Adult neurologists need to be aware of this late complication.

  • Abdominal pseudocyst
  • ventriculoperitoneal shunting

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed. This paper was reviewed by Ian Pople, Bristol, UK.

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