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Pract Neurol doi:10.1136/practneurol-2012-000473
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Coagulation of cerebrospinal fluid—the Nonne–Froin sign

  1. Henrik Zetterberg1,5
  1. 1Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden
  2. 2Geriatric Clinic, Gävle County Hospital, Gavle, Sweden
  3. 3Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden
  4. 4The Medical History Museum, Göteborg, Gothenburg, Sweden
  5. 5UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Niklas Mattsson, Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal 431 80, Sweden; niklas.mattsson{at}neuro.gu.se

A 60-year-old previously healthy woman sought medical attention at a memory clinic for subjective cognitive impairment. Neurological and cognitive testing was normal, except that she performed at the lower limit of normal in A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) and Rey complex figure tests. MRI of the brain was normal. As a part of the investigation she underwent lumbar puncture, a routine procedure in memory investigations in Sweden.

The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was found to be yellow and viscous. The CSF flow through the lumbar …


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