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Spinal cord tumour misdiagnosed as seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
  1. Dan Buch1,
  2. Caroline Dehais2,
  3. Julien Savatovsky3,
  4. Karima Mokhtari4,
  5. Olivier Gout1,
  6. Romain Marignier5,
  7. Romain Deschamps1
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris, France
  2. 2Department of Neurology, Mazarin, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, Paris, France
  3. 3Department of Radiology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris, France
  4. 4Département of Neuropathology, UF de Pathologie Neuro-Oncologique -Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, Paris, France
  5. 5Department of Neurology, Hôpital Pierre Wertheimer, Bron cedex, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Romain Deschamps, Department of Neurology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 25 Rue Manin, Paris 75019, France; rdeschamps{at}fo-rothschild.fr

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A young woman presented with a 2-month history of progressive severe spastic paraparesis. An MR scan of spine showed a longitudinally-extensive myelopathy (figure 1). MR scan of the brain was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein at 1.33 g/L, a normal white cell count, no malignant cells and normal glucose. An exhaustive biological blood screening was negative except for detection of antibodies targeting the M23 isoform on aquaporin-4 transfected cells.

Figure 1

MR scan of spine showing a longitudinally-extensive spinal cord lesion. (A) Sagittal T2 cervico thoracic cord MRI shows an extensive spindle-like hyperintense …

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