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SUDEP, the aftermath: supporting the bereaved
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  • Published on:
    SUDEP: The thing we fear more than death
    • Fulvio A. Scorza, Neurology Disciplina de Neurociência. Escola Paulista de Medicina/Universidade Federal de São Paulo. (EPM/UNIFESP). São Paulo, Brasil.
    • Other Contributors:
      • Esper A. Cavalheiro, Neurology

    We came across the pages of the article of Nashef and Leach recently released to the scientific community through the Practice Neurology with a great enthusiasm.1 The authors have not only had courage, but have had special ability in touching on such an important matter in a scientific and subtle manner simultaneously. As we know, along the past twenty years there has been exponential growth in the number of articles published on SUDEP with a triple increase in this scientific production in the last ten years.2 Therefore a great scientific breakthrough in SUDEP has been established with regard to epidemiological aspects, specific risk factors, mechanisms involved and possible preventive measures (if they really exist) 3. And yet, it is very well defined that the main risk factor for SUDEP is the presence and number of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS)3 and the best way to avoid a tragic event is to control these GTCS. In parallel, there is also an imperative issue in relation to all these aspects: how, when, where, why and what patients should we address on SUDEP? Despite the great effort of epileptologists and elegant studies already published, the discussion on SUDEP with patients is still a matter of debate among experts.4 In order to enable this debate, we will have to somehow let the conservative side and consider the current numbers that demonstrate that 1 in every 1000 young adults and 1 in every 4500 children with epilepsy may suddenly die. 5 And more, accor...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.