eLetters

99 e-Letters

  • Diabetic Neuropathies
    Colin L. Crawford

    Dear Editor,

    In Figure 1c, in Little et al’s article on diabetic neuropathy (1), there is a glove and stocking distribution of sensory loss, but with extensive involvement of the upper limbs. This is exactly the distribution of sensory loss in patients with leprosy, demonstrated in 1923 by Monrad-Krohn and shown in the Figure (2). This was a meticulous clinical examination of 63 Norwegian patients. While multiple...

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  • Sui H Wong

    Dear Editor,

    The article on a neurological MRI menagerie by Jonathan Schott1 was a good read. I would like to highlight an important and potentially treatable differential diagnosis for the “eye of the tiger” sign, highlighted by Professor Patrick Chinnery in his interesting talk at the 29th Advanced Clinical Neurology Course in Edinburgh in May this year and recently published in Brain. Neuroferritinopathy produce...

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  • Uzochukwu E Egere

    Dear Editor,

    I am impressed that Ridsdale et al has done justice to a topic that has been on many minds. I cannot but hail this wonderful masterpiece of theirs and hope that all in the medical profession having anything to do with the Nervous System would lay their hands on this article.

    I was a patient of Neurophobia until the third year in my residency when during my second rotation in Neurology, i develo...

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  • No ghosts - I agree
    Saman Gunatilake

    Dear Editor,

    I fully agree with the comeents made by Prof Warlow on current medical research. How often have we found ourselves proven wrong with time, of what we thought marvellous treatments. This trend will continue and will expand with the trend to find out modest benefits of treatment effects by large trials. We may say the same of such trials one day and I wonder if Prof Warlow would agree....

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  • Demystifying Neurology: Preventing “Neurophobia” by Keeping it Familiar and Simple
    Erle CH Lim

    Dear Editor,

    In their article on neurophobia, or fear of the neural sciences and clinical neurology, Ridsdale et al highlight an important phenomenon, i.e. the misperception that clinical neurology is difficult and only understood by those who are “brilliant, forgetful” with bulging crania and loud bow ties [1], an impression which may have been encouraged by neurologists who thrive on perpetuating this myth of omn...

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  • Xanthopsia in the absence of absinthe
    Rhys H Thomas

    Dear Editor,

    I must thank Dr Smith for his entertaining and informative case study of van Gogh. (1) It pains me to ask for caution to be used when interpreting his findings, (particularly as I love a good pun for a title).

    Arnold and Loftus in 1991 calculated that one must drink 182 litres of absinthe to induce xanthopsia. (2,3,4) After that lethal load, one can only speculate that it may be difficult for Mr V...

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  • Ulnar neuropathy
    A J Larner

    Dear Editor

    I very much enjoyed Dr Stewart’s informative article on ulnar neuropathies in the August issue of the journal,1 which included images of Rodin’s The Thinker to demonstrate that elbow flexion may increase the likelihood of nerve damage.

    May I suggest the painting of Saint Bartholomew of 1661 (see fig) by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–69) in the J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, as a possible exam...

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  • Clinical neurology in practice
    Abhijit Chaudhuri

    Dear Editor,

    I felt rather uncomfortable with some of the articles in the August 2006 issue of the Practical Neurology and it was not because I was reading the journal in a sultry afternoon of Indian summer.

    Andrew Chancellor was wrong in invoking a clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in his fourth problem (Test Yourself, p260). The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) cannot be made without objecti...

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  • Nerve ultrasonography in practical work
    Mahamoud M Gabal

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest this work ..indeed nerve ultrasonography has other parameters more than cross section area measurements in detection of the pathological changes and prediction of outcome of the treatment (medical or surgical}...the normal nerve as seen by high resolution ultrasonography is:

    1- oval shaped or round with high ability to change its shape in response to applied pressure easi...

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