Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Zika virus infection in the returning traveller: what every neurologist should know
  1. Sonja Emily Leonhard1,
  2. Suzannah Lant2,
  3. Bart C Jacobs3,
  4. Annelies Wilder-Smith4,
  5. Maria Lucia Brito Ferreira5,
  6. Tom Solomon2,6,7,
  7. Hugh John Willison8
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  2. 2Institute of Infection and Global Health, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
  3. 3Department of Neurology and Immunology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  4. 4Unit of Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
  5. 5Department of Neurology, Hospital da Restauração, Recife, Brazil
  6. 6National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
  7. 7Department of Neurology, Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
  8. 8Department of Neurology and Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Hugh John Willison, Department of Neurology and Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; Hugh.Willison{at}glasgow.ac.uk

Abstract

Zika virus has been associated with a wide range of neurological complications. Neurologists in areas without current active transmission of the virus may be confronted with Zika-associated neurological disease, as a large number of returning travellers with Zika virus infection have been reported and the virus continues to spread to previously unaffected regions. This review provides an overview of Zika virus-associated neurological disease and aims to support neurologists who may encounter patients returning from endemic areas.

  • zika virus
  • neurovirology
  • clinical neurology
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • neuroimmunology

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • SEL and SL contributed equally.

  • Contributors SEL: study concept and design, acquisition of data, draft of the first manuscript and interpretation of the data, revision of the manuscript for intellectual content. SL: study concept and design, draft of the first manuscript and interpretation of the data, revision of the manuscript for intellectual content. TS, BCJ, HJW, AWS: study concept and design, revision of the manuscript for intellectual content. MLBF: acquisition of data.

  • Funding The study is funded by a grant from the European Union (Horizon 2020, ZikaPLAN grant agreement number 734584 to SEL, SL, TS, AWS, BCJ, MLBF and HJW) and a grant from the Wellcome Trust and UK DFID (203680/Z/16/Z to HJW), and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at the University of Liverpool (TS and SL).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed. This paper was reviewed by Nick Davies, London, UK, and Hadi Manji, London, UK.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Other content recommended for you