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Can compressive thoracic cord lesions cause a pure lower motor neurone syndrome?
  1. Chin Yong Kok1,
  2. Hoskote Chandrashekar2,
  3. Christopher Turner1,
  4. Hadi Manji1,
  5. Alexander M Rossor1
  1. 1 MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
  2. 2 Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Alexander M Rossor, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London WC1N 3BG, UK; a.rossor{at}ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Compressive lesions of the spinal cord usually cause a syndrome of upper motor neurone weakness, spasticity and sensory loss below the level of the lesion. It has long been recognised that compressive cervical cord lesions may present as isolated lower motor neurone weakness of the upper limbs, a syndrome termed cervical spondylotic amyotrophy. We describe two patients presenting with isolated lower motor neurone weakness of the lower limbs in association with a compressive cord lesion at T11/12, a condition we have termed thoracic spondylotic amyotrophy.

  • neurophysiology, motor
  • myelopathy
  • motor neurone disease

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CYK wrote the first draft of the manuscript. CH, HM and CT revised the manuscript and provided clinical care for the patients. AMR collected clinical cases, and wrote and revised the manuscript.

  • Funding AMR is funded by a Wellcome Trust Postdoctoral Fellowship for Clinicians (110043/Z/15/Z). This research was also supported by the National Institute for Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre.

  • Competing interests AMR has received support from Alnylam UK to attend scientific meetings and an honorarium for speaking at a sponsored symposium.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned. Externally peer reviewed by Andrew Chancellor, Tauranga, New Zealand.

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