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UK consensus on pregnancy in multiple sclerosis: ‘Association of British Neurologists’ guidelines
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  • Published on:
    UK Consensus on pregnancy in multiple sclerosis: an update
    • Ruth Dobson, MD Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine
    • Other Contributors:
      • Peter Brex, Dr

    Dear Editors,

    Following the publication of the “UK consensus on pregnancy in multiple sclerosis: ABN guidelines” in January 2019, new data has become available and an update is required. Whilst these updates do not change the overall recommendations in the guidelines, they add information, which we feel all neurologists should be aware of in order to provide the highest quality of information to all women with MS considering pregnancy.

    (1) Interferon beta preparations in pregnancy

    In September 2019, the EMA Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended a label change for interferon beta-1a, peginterferon beta-1a and interferon beta-1b, i.e. Avonex, Betaferon, Extavia, Plegridy and Rebif, stating that they may be considered during pregnancy if clinically indicated, and can be used during breastfeeding [1]. This decision was based on data from interferon beta registries, national registries and post-marketing experience. However, data from exposure during second and third trimesters remains limited. The duration of exposure during the first trimester is uncertain, because data were collected when interferon beta use was contraindicated during pregnancy, and it is likely that treatment was interrupted in many women when the pregnancy was detected and/or confirmed.

    This supports the recommendation in the “UK consensus on pregnancy in multiple sclerosis: ABN guidelines” that these products are safe to be continued at least until...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.