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‘Fasciculations’: linguistic slip or judicious advance?
  1. J Bashford
  1. Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to J Bashford, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London SE5 9RT, UK; james.bashford{at}kcl.ac.uk

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It was with great interest that I read Baker & Williams’ persuasive account outlining the correct use of the term ‘fasciculation’.1 The plural ‘fasciculations’, they argue, has erroneously slipped into the medical vernacular since Denny-Brown and Pennybacker coined the singular term in 1938.2 Fasciculation, they emphasise, represents a ‘state of being’ and therefore is a binary entity; fasciculation is either present or it is not. On reading this fascinating etymological tour, I felt compelled to present a counter-argument. I propose that the oft-used plural form represents much more than mere solecism.

There are alternative ‘…-ation’ words where the plural form is not only acceptable, …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JB was the sole author.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned. Internally peer reviewed.

  • Ethical approval information No ethical approval was required.

  • Data sharing statement Not applicable.

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