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Superficial siderosis treated with dural tear repair and deferiprone
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  • Published on:
    Comment on: Nathoo N, Naik S, Rempel J, et al. Superficial siderosis treated with dural tear repair and deferiprone. Pract Neurol 2021;21(1):71-72.
    • Daniel ESCHLE, Consultant Neurologist Kantonsspital Uri in 6460 Altdorf (Switzerland)

    Comment on: Nathoo N, Naik S, Rempel J, et al. Superficial siderosis treated with dural tear repair and deferiprone. Pract Neurol 2021;21(1):71-72.

    Dear Colleagues

    Concerning “superficial siderosis” I would like to emphasize that we have to distinguish two different types regarding localization and pathophysiology: 1) The infratentorial type that was described in the case report [1]. Patients present with a triad of sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia and myelopathy [2]. Treatment is based on staunching recurrent bleeding and elimination of toxic iron deposits with deferiprone. The latter is not without some risk: neutropenia with sepsis [3]. – 2) The supratentorial type is a manifestation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the vast majority of cases [4], and there is no known cure. Cortical superficial siderosis – of the supratentorial type – is the cause of transient focal neurological episodes that can mimic transient ischaemic attacks, migraine auras or simple partial seizures [5].

    Yours sincerely,

    Daniel Eschle, MD, MSc
    Consultant Neurologist
    Kantonsspital Uri, 6460 Altdorf (Switzerland), Telephone: ++41 41 875 51 51
    E-Mail: deschle@hotmail.com or daniel.eschle@ksuri.ch

    Conflicts of interest and ethics
    The author declares that there are no conflicts of interest, in particular none with a manufacturer of pharmaceutical products...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.

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