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Hyper-religiosity in frontotemporal dementia with predominant atrophy of the right temporal lobe
  1. Maria Karatzikou,
  2. Theodora Afrantou,
  3. Dimitrios Parissis,
  4. Panagiotis Ioannidis
  1. 2nd Department of Neurology, University General Hospital of Thessaloniki AHEPA, Thessaloniki, Greece
  1. Correspondence to Dr Maria Karatzikou, 2nd Department of Neurology, University General Hospital of Thessaloniki AHEPA, Thessaloniki 54621, Greece; maria.kar2506{at}gmail.com

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Case description

A 56-year-old Greek woman developed personality changes, presenting first with prominent hyper-religiosity alternating with periods of retardation, together with social disinhibition. For 10 months before, she had expressed extravagant religiosity, having previously been religiously indifferent. She had begun praying at home, reading Christian magazines and attending church frequently. She had also collected and decorated personal health folders with collages of religious pictures (figure 1). There were no problems with memory, facial recognition or visuospatial function.

Figure 1

Saints’ collage by a patient with right temporal lobe atrophy.

On examination, she showed psychomotor agitation with severe inability to maintain concentration and could not focus on specific tasks. Nevertheless, she remained orientated to person, place and time, …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MK was involved in study conception, design and drafting of the manuscript, analysis and interpretation of data and acquisition of data. TA was involved in revising the manuscript for content, analysis and interpretation of data. DP was involved in revising the manuscript for content, analysis and interpretation of data. PI was involved in study conception, design and drafting of the manuscript, analysis and interpretation of data and acquisition of data and study supervision.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Parental/guardian consent obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed by Jonathan Rohrer, London, UK.

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