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Lessons from the video-EEG telemetry unit
  1. Giulia Attard Navarro1,
  2. Khalid Hamandi2
  1. 1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Welsh Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Giulia Attard Navarro, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS, UK; giulia.attardnavarro{at}nhs.net; Professor Khalid Hamandi, Welsh Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK; hamandik{at}cf.ac.uk

Abstract

Epilepsy is a clinical diagnosis, based primarily on patient and witness histories. Where there is diagnostic uncertainty or when epilepsy surgery is being considered, long-term video-EEG monitoring in a telemetry unit remains the gold standard investigation for diagnostic clarification or presurgical localisation. We present six illustrative cases, highlighting important points that emerged during video-EEG review including potential pitfalls in video-EEG interpretation, and how the investigation helped with diagnosis and subsequent management. The diagnostic process strongly emphasises seizure semiology, more so than EEG.

  • EEG
  • EPILEPSY
  • EPILEPSY, SURGERY
  • NEUROPHYSIOL, CLINICAL

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GAN wrote and revised the paper. KH conceived the main concept of the paper and revised the paper. Both authors approved the final version.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned. Externally peer reviewed by Fahmida Chowdhury, London, UK.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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