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How to set up a functional neurological disorder education group
  1. Biba Stanton1,2,
  2. Tim Segal1,
  3. Abigail Bradley-Westguard3,
  4. Mark Edwards1,4
  1. 1Neuropsychiatry, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Neurology, King's College Hospital, London, UK
  3. 3Patient Representative, London, UK
  4. 4Institute of Psychiatry Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Biba Stanton, Department of Neurology, King’s College Hospital, London, UK; biba.stanton{at}nhs.net

Abstract

Functional neurological disorder (FND) can be a difficult diagnosis for patients to understand and for clinicians to explain. The postdiagnostic support that patients with other chronic neurological illnesses normally receive is often not available to patients with FND. Here, we share our experience of how to set up an FND education group, including the content, practical aspects of delivering groups and how to avoid potential pitfalls. A group education session can improve understanding of the diagnosis among patients and caregivers, reduce stigma and provide self-management advice. Such groups should be multidisciplinary and include input from service users.

  • clinical neurology
  • neuropsychiatry

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors contributed equally to the paper.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed by Jon Stone, Edinburgh, UK.

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