Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Seizures and skin crawling: neurocysticercosis with subcutaneous cysticercosis
  1. Dylan Selbst1,
  2. Sai Sachin Divakaruni2,
  3. Carly Weber-Levine3,
  4. Elias S Sotirchos2
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Department of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  3. 3Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Elias S Sotirchos, Department of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ess{at}jhmi.edu

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Case and discussion

A 23-year-old man presented following a first-time generalised tonic-clonic seizure. He had been previously healthy and had moved to the USA from India 8 months before. He reported a ‘skin crawling’ sensation over the posterior scalp and neck. His neurological examination was unremarkable, but examination of the scalp and neck identified multiple 1–2 cm indurated, freely mobile subcutaneous nodules. MR scan of brain showed non-cystic enhancing lesions with surrounding vasogenic oedema in the left superior temporal gyrus and left superior vermis. These lesions showed no evidence of calcification on CT scanning or on MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (figure 1A–C). There was …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Contributors DS and SSD contributed equally to this paper. ESS is the guarantor.

  • Funding We thank the NINDS R25 NS065729 to SSD.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally reviewed by Agnes Fleury, Mexico City, Mexico.