eLetters

26 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • Letter from Rome: Celiac disease and brain
    Ludovico Abenavoli

    Dear Editor

    The history of celiac disease (CD) is very long. The cultivation of grains, developed in the Neolithic period after the last ice age, particularly in the “Fertile Crescent” of the Near East including the Tigris, the Euphrates and the Upper Nile. With the development of cooking, agriculture came into its own and wheat became a main support of the vast growth in population in successive millennia. Thus ar...

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  • The superspecialization of neurology
    Nitin K Sethi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with keen interest Dr. Davenport’s editorial” why can’t I make a neurological diagnoses anymore?” 1. I am currently in my second year of fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology in the USA and even though I am heading down the path of superspecialization or rather subspecialization in neurology, as Dr. Davenport points out, I could not agree more with his comments.

    Here in the U...

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  • recurrent meningitis, right to left shunts, and blood cultures
    oscar,m jolobe

    Dear Editor

    For the sake of completeness, mention must also be made of the role of right to left shunts, exemplified by pulmonary arteriovenous malformations attributable to hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia(1)(2), and also exemplified by patent dusctus arteriosus with shunt reversal(3), in the aetiopathogenesis of recurrent bacterial meningitis, both meningococcal(1), and pneumococcal(3), as well as cerebral...

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  • Career driven and clinically relevant research
    Andre J des Etages

    Dear Editor,

    This article highlights an important aspect of scientific training not only to neurologists, but to all clinicians. Advances in neuroimaging,genetic analysis and molecular biology constantly advance our understanding of disease and challenge our approach to treating patients. This demands that even clinically oriented neurologists and neurosurgeons have not only a basic understanding of the process o...

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  • much still needs to be done to make tests of cognitive function fit for purpose
    oscar,m jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    Given the crucial importance of evaluation of cognitive function for purposes such as assessment of capacity to make a will(1), the broadspectrum strategy employed by the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination(ACE)(2) will help overcome limitations of the Minimental State Examination(MMSE) exemplified by the acknowledgement that "someone who scores 27/30 may lack capacity because of impaired judgment and...

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  • unruptured intracranial aneurysms are potential candidates for chronic headache
    oscar,m jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    Although chronic daily headache is considered by some neurologists to be one of the least engaging parts of their job(1), the author, nevertheless did remarkable justice to the topic in his review(1). Among the recent developments in the evaluation of chronic headache, ranging from headaches which occured daily to headaches occuring 2 to 3 times a month, was a retrospective analysis of symptom outcome...

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  • Entrée to understanding common conditions?
    JOHN M.S. PEARCE

    Dear Editor,

    Thanks to Kevin Talbot for a wise and timely caution, prefaced by an apt quotation from Jeremy Bentham. Bentham also observed:

    "He who thinks and thinks for himself, will always have a claim to thanks; it is no matter whether it be right or wrong, so as it be explicit. If it is right, it will serve as a guide to direct; if wrong, as a beacon to warn. "

    John M S Pearce

    ...
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  • Diabetic Neuropathies
    Colin L. Crawford

    Dear Editor,

    In Figure 1c, in Little et al’s article on diabetic neuropathy (1), there is a glove and stocking distribution of sensory loss, but with extensive involvement of the upper limbs. This is exactly the distribution of sensory loss in patients with leprosy, demonstrated in 1923 by Monrad-Krohn and shown in the Figure (2). This was a meticulous clinical examination of 63 Norwegian patients. While multiple...

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  • Sui H Wong

    Dear Editor,

    The article on a neurological MRI menagerie by Jonathan Schott1 was a good read. I would like to highlight an important and potentially treatable differential diagnosis for the “eye of the tiger” sign, highlighted by Professor Patrick Chinnery in his interesting talk at the 29th Advanced Clinical Neurology Course in Edinburgh in May this year and recently published in Brain. Neuroferritinopathy produce...

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  • Uzochukwu E Egere

    Dear Editor,

    I am impressed that Ridsdale et al has done justice to a topic that has been on many minds. I cannot but hail this wonderful masterpiece of theirs and hope that all in the medical profession having anything to do with the Nervous System would lay their hands on this article.

    I was a patient of Neurophobia until the third year in my residency when during my second rotation in Neurology, i develo...

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