eLetters

121 e-Letters

  • the practical approach also requires recognition of cardiogenic vertigo
    oscar,m jolobe

    Over and above the recommendation that clinicians should have a low threshold for lying and standing blood pressure measurements in the elderly, even when the history is not typical(1), mention must also be made of the role of cardiac investigations such as telemetry, so as to identify conduction defects as an underlying cause in patients who present with vertigo(2), even though this issue was not raised by the authors. Th...

    Show More
  • Why I want to be a Neurologist?
    Lekhjung Thapa

    Dear Sir,

    The article "Why I became a neurologist" passed through my brain into my heart because I am in the same place as you were so many years ago. The world has changed a lot, but in different countries at different paces - we in Nepal are many years behind you in Australia. You were inspired by your father and grandfather by virtue of their intelligence, but for me I became interested in neurology, and in stroke...

    Show More
  • a restatement of core values
    oscar,m jolobe

    Professor Warlow is to be congratulated on his masterly restatement of the core values of clinical medicine, in general, and neurology, in particular(1). As a corollary to his observation regarding "whether what you find on imaging is relevant to the problem or is merely incidental"(1), recognition should be made that the scan, itself, may generate images which are either falsely normal(2), or too nonspecifically abnormal...

    Show More
  • Why I shall never stop examining patients
    Nitin K. Sethi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the editorial by Dr. Warlow (1). It follows the earlier editorial by Dr. Hawkes titled "I have stopped examining patients" (2). That editorial evoked a fury of concerned responses from both neurologists and neurologists to be. The editorial by Dr.Warlow will be far less controversial and I feel aptly balances the debate between examining and not examining neurologists. Dr....

    Show More
  • neurogenic bladder dysfunction and chronic subdural haematoma
    oscar,m jolobe

    Although no mention of subdural haematoma was made by the authors(1), the occurence of reversible urinary retention, even in a patient who is awake and ambulatory, can be a feature of bilateral chronic subdural haematoma, as was the case in an 87 year old woman reported by Lang et al(2). On the basis of the fact that she regained full bladder control after evacuation of the haematoma, the authors proposed that there might be...

    Show More
  • another moral from the cautionary tale
    oscar,m jolobe

    The cautionary tale of miscalculation of the corrected QT interval(1) highlights the extent to which clinicians and their patients can become hostages to fortune when they base important clinical decisions on "numbers" churned out by electronic gadgets whose validity has not been "cross checked" manually. The sometimes indiscriminate use of oscillometric devices for blood pressure measurement is another case in point. My anx...

    Show More
  • diagnostic accuracy is required also for the short QT syndrome
    oscar,m jolobe

    Accurate measurement of the QT interval is relevant, not only for the diagnosis of long QT interval syndromes(1), but also for the recognition of short QT syndromes which are familial disorders now recognised to be characterised by complications such as a trial fibrillation, syncope, and sudden death, in the absence of structural heart disease(2)(3). The typical electocardiographic "signature" is a short QT interval associate...

    Show More
  • The wider issue of non-Wilsonian movement disorders associated with subnormal or borderline caerulop
    oscar,m jolobe

    When dealing with movement disorders which are associated with subnormal caeruloplasmin levels, account should be taken, not only of Wilson's disease(as was the case in a recent review)(1) where neurological features are attributable to copper deposition in the basal ganglia(2), but also of acaeruloplasminaemia, where neurological features are attributable to iron deposition in the basal ganglia, thalamus, dentate nucleus, an...

    Show More
  • Neurology in Iraq
    H Ramadan

    I am very grateful to Dr Amin's interest in this short letter and his useful comments. The aim of this letter was to inform PN readers about difficulties of Iraqi doctors especially neuroscience clinicians been through in light of successive damaging wars inflicted in to this country.

    Dr Amin himself, names he mentioned and others (locally and overseas trained) are among distinguished hardworking neurologists in...

    Show More
  • Neurology in Iraq; the past and the future, who is the winner?
    Osama SM Amin MRCPI, FCCP, FACP

    Many thanks to Ramadan and his colleagues for this article about neurology in the land of Mesopotamia. I have few notes:

    1. The author has not mentioned other neurologists who participated substantially in the creation of the subject "neurology in Iraq," and these are Muhammed Tawfiq, Fadhil Al-Hadithy, and Adnan Al-Araji; Ajeeb Ali practiced neurology in a city in the north of Iraq and was away from the teachi...

    Show More

Pages