Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Trigeminal autonomic cephalgia caused by recurrent posterior scleritis
  1. Ali Alim-Marvasti1,
  2. Jason Ho2,
  3. Mark Weatherall1,
  4. Maneesh Patel3,
  5. Sheena George2,
  6. Stuart Viegas1
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Uxbridge, Hillingdon, UK
  3. 3Department of Neuroradiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Stuart Viegas, Department of Neurology, Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; stuart.viegas{at}nhs.net

Abstract

A 40-year-old woman presented with a side-locked headache with autonomic features, which then switched sides before reverting to the original side. The atypical features of side swapping, partial response to indometacin and abnormal optic disc appearances ultimately led to a diagnosis of recurrent posterior scleritis. We discuss the differential diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and its secondary causes, and provide practical pointers for its investigation and management.

  • NEUROOPHTHALMOLOGY
  • HEADACHE
  • STEROIDS
  • NEURORADIOLOGY
  • OPHTHALMOLOGY

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.